New Solution to an Old Problem

As you may already know we had been sitting on our kitchen cabinet project for quite some time. We were living without doors on our cabinets for a few months. The cabinet project as a whole was a bit ambitious from the start, and saw a few roadblocks along the way, but I’m happy to say, it is complete.

Kitchen Remodel Before & After

You’ve seen the dramatic transformation twice before when we did a lot of work early on. We had some big ideas about using polycarbonate Lexan and replacing the old clear plastic brown windows. This proved to be more difficult than we had planned, and I ended up cracking some of it by using the wrong tools. Side note: the recommended tools used from scoring and snapping the Lexan don’t work too well either.

Beadboard Paneling for Cabinets

We put Plan B in motion while we were off from work between Christmas and New Years. It developed very quickly and at a much lower cost than anything involving plexiglass. We re-purposed some beadboard to fill in the cabinet windows. This is the stuff that would normally be used as wall paneling, usually with wainscoting.

Cutting Beadboard with a Jigsaw

This stuff is easy to cut, and since I already had the measurements from the plexi attempts, this was a simple job for me and my trusty jigsaw. However, after making the first few cuts, I noticed the edge where I was sawing was starting to fray. In a moment of mild concern I called the mill work department at Lowe’s and asked them how they’d do it. They suggested using blue painter’s tape along both sides of the cut.

Using a Jigsaw to cut Beadboard for Cabinets

Cut Beadboard

The blue painter’s tape really saved the day and stopped any and all fraying.

Liquid Nails for Cabinets

The next step was to pop the cut pieces into place. For this I used Liquid Nails. This stuff has been our go-to for strong holds and worked really well when we needed to get new molding to stick to our tile wall in the kitchen. With the beadboard in place, I just had to weight it down over night before mounting the doors back up onto their respective cabinets.

Cabinet Doors

As it turns out, no two of our cabinet doors are the same size (fun!) and it was a bit of a challenge to figure out which one went where. Stay tuned for part two of the final phase of our kitchen cabinet project – pictures of the finished product will be included!